How Modern Video Game Coverage Has Reduced Critics to Human Punching Bags | VICE | United States

IMG_2281I’ve started to feel really bad for video game critics and writers. It really doesn’t make sense all the hate they get. I have no real understanding of where this anger comes from. Is it related to a changing gaming landscape, and the change makes most gamers afraid? Is it purely related to internet anonymity? Or something else?

How Modern Video Game Coverage Has Reduced Critics to Human Punching Bags | VICE | United States.

The legal battle for gaming’s past | Polygon

Archivist have dealt with these types of legal issues for year, but focusing on preserving games, specifically through circumventing any kind of access controls or DRM, refrains the conversations nicely. Games can seem like “magic”, and this “magic” obscures all the software and hardware that’s used to run. What happens when that “magic” is no longer supported by the original creators? How do archivist try to recreate it? Well in this case the ESA, the Entertainment Software Association, wants to keep all the secrets to themselves.

The legal battle for gaming’s past | Polygon.

Sad Puppies’ Hijacking of the Hugo Awards Won’t Stifle Diversity in Science Fiction — The Atlantic

#gamergate reminds me a of cemetery gate.
#gamergate or the gate to no where

This is the second time today that I’ve seen #gamergate brought up. I really don’t understand the desire disengage from people who have different perspectives and opinions than you. I really tried to understand this mentality and the companion ways of thinking that encourages raging when ideas conflict with your own and retreating to a core group of like-minded peers. The world is much more interesting with there’s different voices being heard and different perspectives been seen.

Sad Puppies’ Hijacking of the Hugo Awards Won’t Stifle Diversity in Science Fiction — The Atlantic.

Dark Souls II Review – GameSpot Or Teaching Should be more Like Dark Souls

I think we should take a page out the From Software playbook when it comes to approaches to teaching. Offer no comfort. Present new “dangerous” ideas to students, and teach them to face what’s coming because it won’t always be nice and pretty.

After three games of hitting a wall at the 30-hour mark, Dark Souls II: Scholar of the First Sin eventually stopped screaming at me and started teaching, in the way that every good teacher should: it took away comfort. Every moment that felt safe and familiar from the last outing was infused with danger, with a new enemy, a new reaction to obstacles, a cue to always be ready to face what’s around the corner–a constant awareness that doesn’t go away the closer you get to the endgame.

Dark Souls II Review – GameSpot.

Marquette Warrior Free Speech Debate: Blog Post Was Ethics Breach | The New Republic

Marquette Warrior Free Speech Debate: Blog Post Was Ethics Breach | The New Republic.

I came to the exactly same conclusion as the author of this New Republic. This was way less about possible political correctness and more about the actions of the faculty member. It’s hard not to talk about your students, but it’s doubly important in how you criticize them in public.

There have been layers to this debate, but this is the major point from this piece.

The problem comes from the fact that Abbate was a student at his university. Professors should never even risk sparking viral outrage against students. What’s especially troubling is that he insulted not just Abbate’s ideas, or her behavior in some general sense, but her academic performance. If he were for whatever reason privy to her transcript, would we defend his free-speech right to blog about its contents? 

 

 

A New Faculty Challenge: Fending Off Abuse on Yik Yak – Faculty – The Chronicle of Higher Education

Policy wise there’s not much, I believe we can do about this, unless there are threats of violence. The issue is really complex. Students have a right to speak their minds, but shouldn’t a faculty member have the right to feel safe in their classroom. The more I think about it I find myself thinking about how online communication de-humanizes discussion. In a face to face talk, you have to acknowledge the other person humanity and conform to social norms of good behavior. Online this a different story. This is doubly true for anonymous communication. There are no social norms or repercussions. There’s an initial reaction to attempt to legislate behavior, but I find that a distasteful solution. I’d rather see new social conventions with social repercussions that attempt to solve this problem. Essentially, collectively we have to start denigrate this kind of activity in a way that makes people feel bad for doing it. I’d recommend being active in class at saying that this is not acceptable behavior. I think it’d be best explain that nothing is truly anonymous even online, and your words can haunt you.

A New Faculty Challenge: Fending Off Abuse on Yik Yak – Faculty – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

Leaked University of Oregon letter warns professor to immediately return 22,000 pages | OregonLive.com

It’s not often that news terrifies me as an archivist, but this has definitely caused me to pause and reflect on my job as a University Archivist. I firmly believe in open access to information, but I plan on watching the case closely. My thoughts are with the archivist who have been suspended.

Leaked University of Oregon letter warns professor to immediately return 22,000 pages | OregonLive.com.